Core muscle function in young adults aged 18 to 30

Rasif, Hazheer (2015) Core muscle function in young adults aged 18 to 30. Honours thesis, University of Southern Queensland. (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Background: The core or the lumbopelvic region of the body is a complex that comprises many anatomical structures that act in concert to maintain core stability and function.
Good core muscle function plays an important role in maintaining good spinal health by reducing occurrences of lower back pathologies and injuries. In addition, it plays a vital role in reducing lower limb injuries. However, gender differences, the effects of age, physical activity, and body composition on core muscle function of young adults have not been fully understood.

Aims: Using a cross-sectional study design, the project aimed to investigate the effects of physical activity and body composition on core muscle function. In addition, the
project explored gender and age related differences in core muscle function in young adults. Moreover, the relationship between core muscle function and lower limb muscle
function was examined.

Methods: 98 young adults (men = 48, women = 50) between the ages of 18 to 30 participated in this project. Body composition variables such as height, weight, body
mass index (BMI), sum of skinfolds (subcutaneous fat mass) and waist circumference were measured. Lengths of time holding the front bridge and side bridge were recorded
as measure of core muscle function. Standing long jump distance was recorded as measure of lower limb muscle function. Weekly exercise duration was used as measure
of physical activity level and this information was collected using a questionnaire. IBM SPSS statistics software version 19 was used to run descriptive statistics, one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), and correlation analysis among the variables.

Results: It was found that increased subcutaneous fat mass, weight and waist circumference were associated with poor core muscle function in men and women (p < 0.05). However, high BMI correlated negatively with men’s core muscle function only (p < 0.05). ANOVA analysis revealed that men had significantly better core muscle function and lower limb muscle function than women (p < 0.05). Exercise duration had a moderate positive correlation with core muscle function in men only (p < 0.05). Significant positive correlation was present between core muscle function and lower limb muscle function in men only (p < 0.05). No significant association was observed
between age and core muscle function and lower limb muscle function in young adults.

Conclusion: The results suggest that young men have better core and lower limb muscle function compared to young women. This may have been due to the higher muscle mass
and lower fat mass in men. In addition, body composition is a good predictor of core and lower limb muscle function. Further, side bridge exercise may not be a good core muscle
assessment tool for untrained women due to their intrinsically weak core muscle function and the exercise’s demanding nature.


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Item Type: Thesis (Non-Research) (Honours)
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Bachelor of Science (Honours) thesis.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Wellbeing
Supervisors: Wang, Jianxiong; Mills, Dean
Date Deposited: 22 Dec 2015 02:54
Last Modified: 22 Dec 2015 02:54
Uncontrolled Keywords: core muscles; young adults
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110601 Biomechanics
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/28266

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