Life cycle energy analysis of eight residential houses in Brisbane, Australia

Guan, Lisa and Walmselya, Madeleine and Chen, Guangnan (2015) Life cycle energy analysis of eight residential houses in Brisbane, Australia. Procedia Engineering, 121. pp. 653-661.

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Abstract

Life cycle energy analysis (LCEA) of eight residential buildings in and around Brisbane, Queensland, Australia, is undertaken in
this study. Energy used in all three phases of construction, operation and demolition are considered. It is found that the main
contribution to the operational energy in residential buildings is from use of general appliance. The choice of building materials
is shown to have significant effects on the embodied energy for the production, construction, maintenance and demolition phases.
From this study, it is shown that the embodied energy may vary from 10% to 30%, while the operational energy may vary from
65% to 90%. The demolition energy generally accounts for less than 4% of life cycle energy.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Published version made available under a creative Commons 3.0 License. Paper from the 9th International Symposium on Heating, Ventilation and Air Conditioning (ISHVAC) joint with the 3rd International Conference on Building Energy and Environment (COBEE), 12-15 July 2015, Tianjin, China.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Date Deposited: 29 Apr 2016 04:39
Last Modified: 29 Nov 2017 00:20
Uncontrolled Keywords: life cycle energy analysis; residential buildings; building embodied energy; building operational energy; building demolition energy
Fields of Research : 12 Built Environment and Design > 1202 Building > 120202 Building Science and Techniques
Socio-Economic Objective: D Environment > 96 Environment > 9603 Climate and Climate Change > 960302 Climate Change Mitigation Strategies
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1016/j.proeng.2015.08.1059
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/27923

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