Sociological developments in the history of health and illness

Ralph, Nicholas (2015) Sociological developments in the history of health and illness. In: Advances in sociology research, Vol. 16. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., New York, NY. United States, pp. 125-135. ISBN 978-1-63482-743-0

Abstract

The concepts of health and illness have been defined differently throughout history. As knowledge has developed, humanity has increasingly attached different meanings to health and illness. These meanings are significant for healthcare workers as they are often attached to the notions of recovery, wellness and the contexts of care provision. In this paper, we explore the sociological constructs of health and illness by identifying how they have been defined over time. Historical developments in our understanding of what health and illness are addressed, along with the range of contemporary understandings of what being 'healthy' is. The implications of these different perspectives about health and illness are discussed in the context of modern healthcare as a means of stimulating important discourse among health professionals and identifying the underpinning purposes to the provision of healthcare in this day and age.


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Item Type: Book Chapter (Commonwealth Reporting Category B)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2015 Nova Science Publishers. Permanent restricted access to paper due to publisher copyright policy. Print version not held in the USQ Library.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Nursing and Midwifery
Date Deposited: 01 Mar 2016 04:19
Last Modified: 29 Sep 2017 03:00
Uncontrolled Keywords: health; illness; history; sociological developments
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1110 Nursing > 111099 Nursing not elsewhere classified
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/27191

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