The efficacy of lime, gypsum and their combination to ameliorate sodicity in irrigated cropping soils in the Lachlan Valley of New South Wales

Bennett, J. McL. and Cattle, S. R. and Singh, B. (2015) The efficacy of lime, gypsum and their combination to ameliorate sodicity in irrigated cropping soils in the Lachlan Valley of New South Wales. Arid Land Research and Management, 29 (1). pp. 17-40. ISSN 1532-4982

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Abstract

Two primary factors controlling dissolution rate of lime and gypsum chemical ameliorants are magnitude and frequency of water infiltration. Thus, it could be expected that longevity of these amendments is reduced under irrigated-systems, relative to dryland-systems. This paper examines efficacy of single and combined applications of lime and gypsum in two irrigated agricultural soils used for cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) and wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) production. Full-field, replicated experimental-strips consisting of control (L0G0) and combinations of 2.5 t=ha lime (L2.5) and=or gypsum (G2.5), and of 5 t=ha lime (L5) and=or gypsum (G5) were applied; there were seven treatments, that is, L0G0, L2.5G0, L0G2.5, L2.5G2.5, L2.5G5, L5G2.5, and L5G5. For both soils, exchangeable and soluble cation concentrations, cation exchange capacity (CEC), pH, electrical conductivity (EC), residual gypsum, aggregate stability in water (ASWAT), and crop production were measured 6 months and 2.5 years after amendment application. Exchange efficiency of calcium (Ca2þ) applied as amendment was calculated after 6 months. Exchange of Ca2þ for sodium (Naþ) was primarily attributable to gypsum, and generally at the higher rate at 6 months; effects did not persisting over 2.5 years. The EC effect of gypsum was not observed after 6 months or 2.5 years post-gypsum application and 12.85ML=ha of infiltrating irrigation-water=rain. Results indicate using lime and gypsum singly, or in combination, at low agronomic rates is not necessarily viable for broadacre-irrigated-agriculture on alkaline clayey soils.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to published version due to publisher copyright policy.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Civil Engineering and Surveying
Date Deposited: 11 Feb 2015 01:39
Last Modified: 24 Jun 2016 04:37
Uncontrolled Keywords: exchange efficiency; gypsum; lime; sodicity
Fields of Research : 07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070306 Crop and Pasture Nutrition
05 Environmental Sciences > 0503 Soil Sciences > 050304 Soil Chemistry (excl. Carbon Sequestration Science)
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0701 Agriculture, Land and Farm Management > 070101 Agricultural Land Management
Socio-Economic Objective: D Environment > 96 Environment > 9612 Rehabilitation of Degraded Environments > 961202 Rehabilitation of Degraded Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Environments
D Environment > 96 Environment > 9614 Soils > 961402 Farmland, Arable Cropland and Permanent Cropland Soils
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1080/15324982.2014.940432
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/26659

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