Associations between objectively measured physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and risk factors for metabolic syndrome in 12-to 15-year-old Tianjin city children

Tan, Sijie and Wang, Jianxiong and Zhang, Yibing and Zhang, Chen (2015) Associations between objectively measured physical activity, cardiorespiratory fitness and risk factors for metabolic syndrome in 12-to 15-year-old Tianjin city children. Health Education Journal, 74 (4). pp. 403-410. ISSN 0017-8969

Abstract

Objective: The aim was to explore associations between daily physical activity level, cardiorespiratory fitness and metabolic syndrome among Chinese children.
Design: We conducted a school-based, cross-sectional study.
Setting: Subjects including 112 boys and 121 girls were recruited from three schools in the urban suburbs of Tianjin city, China.
Methods: A total of 233 children (12–15 years old) were recruited from the urban suburbs of Tianjin, China. Their daily physical activity level was monitored using accelerometry. Cardiorespiratory fitness was evaluated through a predicted maximal oxygen uptake. The prevalence of metabolic syndrome and its basic components were determined. Correlations between specific components of metabolic syndrome and daily physical activity and maximal oxygen uptake were assessed.
Results: In all, 5.4% of the boys and 2.5% of the girls had metabolic syndrome, identified by the modified International Diabetes Federation definition. Moderate physical activity level had a negative correlation with blood pressure, but did not correlate with other components. Predicted maximal oxygen uptake displayed significant correlations with more components of childhood metabolic syndrome than those of physical activity level.
Conclusion: Daily physical activity level did not show a significant correlation with the components of metabolic syndrome in 12 to 15 year old Tianjin city children. However, planned exercise with a goal of improving maximal oxygen uptake should be stressed in school physical education in order to prevent the development of childhood metabolic syndrome.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to Published version version due to publisher copyright policy.
Faculty / Department / School: Current - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Health and Wellbeing
Date Deposited: 19 Apr 2015 23:01
Last Modified: 09 Sep 2016 02:51
Uncontrolled Keywords: accelerometry; children; China; metabolic syndrome; physical activity
Fields of Research : 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110602 Exercise Physiology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1101 Medical Biochemistry and Metabolomics > 110107 Metabolic Medicine
13 Education > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130210 Physical Education and Development Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio-Economic Objective: C Society > 92 Health > 9205 Specific Population Health (excl. Indigenous Health) > 920501 Child Health
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1177/0017896914541556
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/25923

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