Threat and opportunity: the impact of social inclusion and feedback recipient likeability on feedback, self-esteem and belonging

Machin, T. M. and Jeffries, C. H. (2013) Threat and opportunity: the impact of social inclusion and feedback recipient likeability on feedback, self-esteem and belonging. In: 48th Australian Psychological Society Annual Conference (APS 2013): Psychology for a Healthy Nation, 8-12 Oct 2013, Cairns, Australia.

Abstract

The need to belong is a basic psychological need and an important motivator of behaviour (Gere & MacDonald, 2010). When individuals are looking for opportunities to connect to others, they are most attracted to likeable people to satisfy their belonging and increase their self-worth (Brown, 1993; Leary, 2005). Social exclusion studies show that individuals are reluctant to perform behaviours that may cause rejection from others (Leary & Baumeister, 2000). A large volume of work has demonstrated that individuals are reluctant to communicate negative feedback and will modify feedback to make it appear less negative (e.g. Jeffries & Hornsey, 2012). The aim of this study was to investigate how feedback recipient likeability impacts on the belonging needs and self-esteem of an individual providing negative feedback. Participants were asked to recall and record a previous experience of social inclusion, or social exclusion, or the food they had eaten in the last 48 hours. They were then asked to evaluate a book review supposedly written by a fellow student and give negative feedback anonymously. This research used a 3 x 2 between group design to investigate social exclusion (inclusion vs exclusion vs control) and feedback recipient likeability (high vs low). Results showed that feedback was not positively modified regardless of feedback likeability. Results also showed that individuals who recalled social exclusion experienced decreased levels of belonging and self-esteem after delivery of negative feedback to a highly likeable individual but had increased levels of belonging and self-esteem after delivery of negative feedback to a less likeable individual. Further analyses showed a three-way interaction between social inclusion and feedback recipient likeability on changes in both belonging and self-esteem after delivery of feedback. These research findings were able to provide a sharper focus on the impact of belonging and self-esteem as a function of likeability, as well as supporting previous research on how anonymity helps alleviate social acceptance concerns thus avoiding modified feedback.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Permanent restricted access to published Abstract due to publisher copyright policy. Abstract only published in Conference Proceedings. Paper no. 31.
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Health, Engineering and Sciences - School of Psychology, Counselling and Community
Date Deposited: 08 Sep 2015 05:00
Last Modified: 13 Feb 2017 00:26
Uncontrolled Keywords: likeability; belonging
Fields of Research : 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170113 Social and Community Psychology
20 Language, Communication and Culture > 2001 Communication and Media Studies > 200105 Organisational, Interpersonal and Intercultural Communication
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170110 Psychological Methodology, Design and Analysis
Socio-Economic Objective: E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/25173

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