Diploid and tetraploid progenitors of wheat are valuable sources of resistance to the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus thornei

Sheedy, J. G. and Thompson, J. P. and Kelly, A. (2012) Diploid and tetraploid progenitors of wheat are valuable sources of resistance to the root lesion nematode Pratylenchus thornei. Euphytica, 186 (2). pp. 377-391. ISSN 0014-2336

Abstract

The root lesion nematode Pratylenchusthornei is widely distributed in Australian wheat (Triticumaestivum) producing regions and can reduce yield by more than 50%, costing the industry AU$50 M/year. Genetic resistance is the most effective form of management but no commercial cultivars are resistant (R) and the best parental lines are only moderately R. The wild relatives of wheat have evolved in P. thornei-infested soil for millennia and may have superior levels of resistance that can be transferred to commercial wheats. To evaluate this hypothesis, a collection of 251 accessions of wheat and related species was tested for resistance to P. thornei under controlled conditions in glasshouse pot experiments over two consecutive years. Diploid accessions were more R than tetraploid accessions which proved more R than hexaploid accessions. Of the diploid accessions, 11 (52%) Aegilopsspeltoides (S-[B]-genome), 10 (43%) Triticummonococcum (A m-genome) and 5 (24%) Triticumurartu (A u-genome) accessions were R. One tetraploid accession (Triticumdicoccoides) was R. This establishes for the first time that P. thornei resistance is located on the A-genome and confirms resistance on the B-genome. Since previous research has shown that the moderate levels of P. thornei resistance in hexaploid wheat are dose-dependent, additive and located on the B and D-genomes, it would seem efficient to target A-genome resistance for introduction to hexaploid lines through direct crossing, using durum wheat as a bridging species and/or through the development of amphiploids. This would allow resistances from each genome to be combined to generate a higher level of resistance than is currently available in hexaploid wheat.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2012 Crown Copyright. Published Version restricted in accordance with copyright policy of publisher.
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Sciences - Department of Biological and Physical Sciences
Date Deposited: 24 Apr 2014 10:26
Last Modified: 09 Feb 2017 01:18
Uncontrolled Keywords: Pratylenchus thornei; Triticum aestivum; Triticum turgidum subsp. durum; Aegilopsspeltoides; Pratylenchusthornei; root-lesion nematode; Triticumdicoccoides; wheat; Triticummonococcum; Triticumurartu
Fields of Research : 06 Biological Sciences > 0604 Genetics > 060406 Genetic Immunology
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070305 Crop and Pasture Improvement (Selection and Breeding)
07 Agricultural and Veterinary Sciences > 0703 Crop and Pasture Production > 070308 Crop and Pasture Protection (Pests, Diseases and Weeds)
Socio-Economic Objective: B Economic Development > 82 Plant Production and Plant Primary Products > 8205 Winter Grains and Oilseeds > 820507 Wheat
Identification Number or DOI: 10.1007/s10681-011-0617-5
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/25121

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