Who am I? Where are we? Where do we go from here?: Marxism, voice, representation, and synthesis

James, Kieran (2010) Who am I? Where are we? Where do we go from here?: Marxism, voice, representation, and synthesis. Critical Perspectives on Accounting, 21 (8). pp. 696-710. ISSN 1045-2354

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Abstract

Recently Kim (2008) and Chua (1998) have warned critical accounting researchers of the dangers involved in oral history research in accounting involving a privileged researcher(s) and a cultural or racial 'other'. The end result of this research often is that the researcher gets a promotion and a pay rise whilst the others remain in the same position that they were in before the research. These warnings are extremely important and should be the source of much personal reflection and even agonizing on the part of those researchers that do this type of research. However, I argue that Kim’s negative tone, whilst justified in a polemic, should not discourage researchers to the extent that they shy away from compassionate explorations of topics involving the other in favour of 'safer' capital markets or other mainstream accounting research. Those researchers writing from a Marxist perspective will continue to see the primary source of exploitation as the capitalist production process and its extraction of surplus-value from the workers without payment. This does not mean that such researchers somehow 'ignore race' although some types of racist acts Marxism finds hard to explain satisfactorily. To illustrate these arguments, I present a case study of the legendary 1970s punk musician and philosopher Joe Strummer of the Clash to suggest how a compassionate and authentic individual can meaningfully and boldly address issues of the other and the exploitation that they face within a Marxist framework. The maturation and increased sophistication of Strummer’s lyrics by 1978 suggest that young artists (and researchers) need to be permitted the opportunity to make mistakes and to grow as part of their own existentialist personal journeys.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Author version deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Depositing User: Dr Kieran James
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Business - School of Accounting, Economics and Finance
Date Deposited: 09 Nov 2010 23:29
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2013 00:05
Uncontrolled Keywords: Louis Althusser; The Clash; class struggle; dialectical materialism; existentialism; Marxism; punk rock; representation; Joe Strummer; voice
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 16 Studies in Human Society > 1608 Sociology > 160805 Social Change
16 Studies in Human Society > 1606 Political Science > 160609 Political Theory and Political Philosophy
16 Studies in Human Society > 1606 Political Science > 160603 Comparative Government and Politics
22 Philosophy and Religious Studies > 2201 Applied Ethics > 220102 Business Ethics
16 Studies in Human Society > 1608 Sociology > 160803 Race and Ethnic Relations
22 Philosophy and Religious Studies > 2203 Philosophy > 220306 Feminist Theory
22 Philosophy and Religious Studies > 2299 Other Philosophy and Religious Studies > 229999 Philosophy and Religious Studies not elsewhere classified
16 Studies in Human Society > 1608 Sociology > 160806 Social Theory
16 Studies in Human Society > 1608 Sociology > 160810 Urban Sociology and Community Studies
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): C Society > 95 Cultural Understanding > 9505 Understanding Past Societies > 950504 Understanding Europe's Past
C Society > 95 Cultural Understanding > 9504 Religion and Ethics > 950409 Workplace and Organisational Ethics
C Society > 95 Cultural Understanding > 9504 Religion and Ethics > 950407 Social Ethics
C Society > 95 Cultural Understanding > 9501 Arts and Leisure > 950101 Music
C Society > 95 Cultural Understanding > 9505 Understanding Past Societies > 950502 Understanding Asia's Past
Identification Number or DOI: doi: 10.1016/j.cpa.2010.06.008
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/8932

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