Using past behaviour and spontaneous implementation intentions to enhance the utility of the theory of planned behaviour in predicting exercise

Brickell, Tracey A. and Chatzisarantis, Nikos L. D. and Pretty, Grace (2006) Using past behaviour and spontaneous implementation intentions to enhance the utility of the theory of planned behaviour in predicting exercise. British Journal of Health Psychology, 11 (2). pp. 249-262. ISSN 1359-107X

Abstract

This study examined the utility of the theory of planned behaviour (TPB), past behaviour, and spontaneous implementation intentions in predicting exercise behaviour. The psychological correlates of spontaneous implementation intentions and the moderating effects of intention, perceived behavioural control, past behaviour, and implementation intentions at various time points were also examined. Design. Data collection occurred over three phases with a 2- and 3-week interval. The attrition rate was 35.97% leaving a total of 162 participants (63 males, 99 females). In the first wave, participants completed measures of TPB, spontaneous implementation intentions, and past behaviour. Behaviour was assessed in the second and third waves, and a follow-up measure of spontaneous implementation intentions was completed in Phase 3. Results. Several regression analyses were conducted. Attitude towards exercise and perceived behavioural control made a significant contribution to the prediction of intention. Intention made a significant contribution to the prediction of implementation intentions. Spontaneous implementation intentions reduced the effect of intention and past behaviour for behaviour at 2 weeks and when indexed over a 5-week period. When behaviour was measured for a 3-week period (following an initial 2-week period), the variance that intention and past behaviour accounted for in exercise behaviour decreased, and spontaneous implementation intentions were no longer a significant predictor of behaviour. Spontaneous implementation intentions were found to interact with past behaviour, such that implementation intentions predicted exercise behaviour only among participants who did not exercise frequently in the past. Conclusions. Implications and future research directions are discussed.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Depositing User: Mrs Melissa Jarick
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Sciences - Department of Psychology
Date Deposited: 01 May 2010 07:17
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 23:51
Uncontrolled Keywords: intention; human behavior; regression analysis, exercise; mathematical statistics; multivariate analysis
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
C Society > 93 Education and Training > 9399 Other Education and Training > 939902 Education and Training Theory and Methodology
Identification Number or DOI: doi: 10.1348/135910705X52471
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/7838

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