Predicting job satisfaction and depression at work: how important are work-related factors?

Machin, M. Anthony (2009) Predicting job satisfaction and depression at work: how important are work-related factors? In: 44th Australian Psychological Society Annual Conference 2009, 30 Sep-4 Oct 2009, Darwin, Australia.

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Abstract

This study compared the degree to which work characteristics added to the prediction of two outcomes (job satisfaction and depression) in a sample of employed Australians after controlling for measures of personality and affectivity (both positive and negative). The main purpose was to examine the unique contribution of various work characteristics to the prediction of job satisfaction and depression. A total of 280 employed participants completed the online survey that assessed the four work characteristics (demands, control, supervisor support and co-worker support), personality (Extraversion and Neuroticism),both positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA), job satisfaction and depressive symptoms. Several hierarchical regression analyses were conducted. The results of the analyses predicting job satisfaction showed that the four work characteristics explained a small but significant proportion of job satisfaction ( R2 = .04, p > .001) after controlling for PA and NA at step 1 (R2 = .60, p > .001) and personality variables at step 2 ( R2 = .00, ns). Control and co-worker support were significant unique predictors of job satisfaction. The results of the analyses predicting depression showed that the four work characteristics explained a nonsignificant proportion of depression ( R2 = .01, ns) after controlling for PA and NA at step 1 (R2 = .29, p > .001) and personality variables at step 2 ( R2 = .21, p > .001). These results are important in that levels of job satisfaction are mainly explained by affect (PA and NA) with a weak contribution from level of job control and co-worker support but no unique contribution from personality variables. When predicting the presence of depressive symptoms, the personality variables contributed additional variance after controlling for PA and NA but there were no unique contributions from the work characteristics. This study compared the degree to which work characteristics added to the prediction of two outcomes(job satisfaction and depression) in a sample of employed Australians after controlling for measures of personality and affectivity (both positive and negative). The main purpose was to examine the unique contribution of various work characteristics to the prediction of job satisfaction and depression. A total of 280 employed participants completed the online survey that assessed the four work characteristics (demands, control, supervisor support and co-worker support), personality (Extraversion and Neuroticism), both positive affect (PA) and negative affect (NA), job satisfaction and depressive symptoms. Several hierarchical regression analyses were conducted. The results of the analyses predicting job satisfaction showed that the four work characteristics explained a small but significant proportion of job satisfaction ( R2 = .04, p > .001) after controlling for PA and NA at step 1 (R2 = .60, p > .001) and personality variables at step 2 ( R2 = .00, ns). Control and co-worker support were significant unique predictors of job satisfaction. The results of the analyses predicting depression showed that the four work characteristics explained a nonsignificant proportion of depression ( R2 = .01, ns) after controlling for PA and NA at step 1 (R2 = .29, p > .001) and personality variables at step 2 ( R2 = .21, p > .001). These results are important in that levels of job satisfaction are mainly explained by affect (PA and NA) with a weak contribution from level of job control and co-worker support but no unique contribution from personality variables. When predicting the presence of depressive symptoms, the personality variables contributed additional variance after controlling for PA and NA but there were no unique contributions from the work characteristics. The focus of work-related interventions designed to improve satisfaction or alleviate depression should give priority to the determinants of PA and NA which have been found to include several workplace characteristics (work demands, control, supervisor support and co-worker support), personality traits, and personal resources such as mastery and efficacy beliefs, a sense of autonomy, positive relatedness with others, and self acceptance


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Poster)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Poster presentation - only abstracts published in the conference proceedings.
Depositing User: Mrs Melissa Jarick
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Sciences - Department of Psychology
Date Deposited: 26 May 2010 05:17
Last Modified: 17 Nov 2014 06:58
Uncontrolled Keywords: job satisfaction; depression; work factors
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
C Society > 92 Health > 9299 Other Health > 929999 Health not elsewhere classified
E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
C Society > 93 Education and Training > 9399 Other Education and Training > 939902 Education and Training Theory and Methodology
E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970117 Expanding Knowledge in Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/7819

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