I’ve got the music in me: scientific basis and application of music in sport and exercise

Terry, Peter C. and Karageorghis, Costas I. (2009) I’ve got the music in me: scientific basis and application of music in sport and exercise. In: Meeting New Challenges and Bridging Cultural Gaps in Sport and Exercise Psychology, 17-21 Jun 2009, Marrakesh, Morocco.

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Abstract

Music is almost omnipresent in sport and exercise environments, and is recognized by researchers and practitioners alike as having the potential to produce significant benefits for physical performance and associated psychological responses. This symposium addresses the use of music in sport and exercise from several different perspectives. The first paper, presented by Dr. Costas Karageorghis, establishes the conceptual basis for music benefits in sport and exercise; discussing conceptual models that explain underlying processes and introducing a revised scale for rating the motivational properties of music. The second paper, presented by Prof. Peter Terry, describes the findings of a meta-analysis of the entire research literature that has tested the purported benefits of music in sport and exercise environments. The meta-analysis confirms significant benefits of music and identifies moderating effects of several personal and situational variables. The third paper, presented by Mr. Garry Kuan, evaluates the effects of unfamiliar music on psycho-physiological measures during imagery, with a view to identifying whether relaxing or arousing music enhances or detracts from the impact of imagery rehearsal on sports performance. The fourth paper, presented by Dr. Costas Karageorghis, re-evaluates the relationship between exercise heart rate and music tempo preference. The final paper, presented by Prof. Peter Terry, reflects on the what, why and how of music interventions with elite performers, based on his experiences as an applied practitioner over the past 25 years. Prof. Tony Morris will act as discussant to stimulate audience participation in an interactive session once the formal presentations are concluded.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Electronic version unavailable. The paper, presented by Prof. Peter Terry, describes the findings of a meta-analysis of the entire research literature that has tested the purported benefits of music in sport and exercise environments. The meta-analysis confirms significant benefits of music and identifies moderating effects of several personal and situational variables.
Depositing User: Prof Peter Terry
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Sciences - Department of Psychology
Date Deposited: 17 Dec 2010 01:02
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 23:29
Uncontrolled Keywords: music; sport; exercise
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170114 Sport and Exercise Psychology
19 Studies in Creative Arts and Writing > 1904 Performing Arts and Creative Writing > 190408 Music Therapy
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1106 Human Movement and Sports Science > 110699 Human Movement and Sports Science not elsewhere classified
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970111 Expanding Knowledge in the Medical and Health Sciences
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/6144

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