Measurements of the upper body ultraviolet exposure to golfers: non-melanoma skin cancer risk, and the potential benefits of exposure to sunlight

Downs, Nathan and Schouten, Peter and Parisi, Alfio and Turner, Joanna (2009) Measurements of the upper body ultraviolet exposure to golfers: non-melanoma skin cancer risk, and the potential benefits of exposure to sunlight. Photodermatology, Photoimmunology and Photomedicine, 25 (6). pp. 317-324. ISSN 0905-4383

[img]
Preview
PDF (Accepted Version)
Downs_Schouten_Parisi_Turner_2009_AV.pdf

Download (225Kb)

Abstract

Background. Geographically, Queensland presents an extreme ultraviolet exposure climate to members of the public engaged in outdoor recreational activity. The risk of developing a skin cancer or an eye disease as a result of incidental exposure to naturally occurring ultraviolet radiation in the outdoor environment is proportionately high in a Queensland population compared to fair skinned population groups residing in comparable Northern Hemisphere latitudes. In contrast to these risks, elderly members of this high growth population group have been reported to be vitamin D deficient. The risks and potential benefits of exposure to sunlight in southern Queensland are assessed in this study with respect to recreational golfing. This sport is a popular recreational activity for the Queensland population and must be played during daylight hours. Methods. The erythemal and vitamin D effective ultraviolet exposure measured to the forearm, upper back and vertex are presented for individuals playing golf under various atmospheric conditions in a seven month period extending from summer to winter. Results. Mean summertime exposures were measured in the 2008 study period to be 1.4, 2.2 and 3.2 SED at forearm, upper back and vertex sites respectively compared to respective wintertime forearm, upper back and vertex exposures of 0.2, 0.3, 0.5 SED, where summertime exposures were recorded in the mean solar zenith angle ranges of 56o to 59o and wintertime exposures were recorded in the mean solar zenith angle range 74o to 83o. Vitamin D3 effective exposures were determined to vary from between 225 Jm-2, 325 Jm 2 and 475Jm-2 during summer and 48 Jm-2, 59 Jm-2 and 88 Jm-2 during winter for the respective forearm, upper back and vertex body sites measured in the above mean solar zenith angle ranges. Conclusion. Exposures to ambient UV during winter on the golf course between 3:00 pm and 5:30 pm could be beneficial for office workers for the production of vitamin D. Optimising exposure periods to late afternoon in the winter months and taking adequate sun protection measures in the summer months are important strategies that golfers can utilise for long term preventative health.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 6125
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Authors Accepted Version deposited in accordacne with the copyright policy of the publisher.
Depositing User: Dr Nathan Downs
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Sciences - Department of Biological and Physical Sciences
Date Deposited: 24 Jan 2010 09:19
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 23:29
Uncontrolled Keywords: golfers; golf; ultraviolet; skin cancer; vitamin D
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1112 Oncology and Carcinogenesis > 111201 Cancer Cell Biology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111716 Preventive Medicine
06 Biological Sciences > 0601 Biochemistry and Cell Biology > 060102 Bioinformatics
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920401 Behaviour and Health
C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920405 Environmental Health
Identification Number or DOI: doi: 10.1111/j.1600-0781.2009.00472.x
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/6125

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only