Social gain: is corporate social responsibility enough?

Rundle-Thiele, Sharyn R. (2009) Social gain: is corporate social responsibility enough? Australasian Marketing Journal, 17 (4). pp. 204-210. ISSN 1441-3582

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Abstract

This paper considers whether the concept of corporate social responsibility (CSR) is sufficient for social behavioural change. Two data sources are used to consider whether alcohol is enjoyed responsibly in Australia by informed adults. First, 582 surveys were analysed to consider whether respondents were adequately informed about alcohol. Second, covert observations were used to record what people actually drink to understand whether alcohol is always enjoyed responsibly. Taken together, the results suggest many adults are not adequately informed and many Australian adults do not enjoy alcohol responsibly. A more rigorous social responsibility approach may be warranted. To achieve sustained behavioural change companies need to move towards corporate social performance (CSP). CSP requires CSR interventions to be evaluated to determine their contribution towards real social gains. CSR is not enough to reach the social goals required by society. The concept of CSP takes away the lip service around CSR by requiring companies to document sustained behavioural change.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Author version deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher (Elsevier).
Depositing User: Assoc Prof Sharyn Rundle-Thiele
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Business - School of Management and Marketing
Date Deposited: 07 Jul 2010 13:00
Last Modified: 16 Oct 2014 03:13
Uncontrolled Keywords: corporate social responsibility, corporate social performance, observation, alcohol.
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 16 Studies in Human Society > 1608 Sociology > 160899 Sociology not elsewhere classified
16 Studies in Human Society > 1608 Sociology > 160810 Urban Sociology and Community Studies
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9204 Public Health (excl. Specific Population Health) > 920414 Substance Abuse
Identification Number or DOI: doi: 10.1016/j.ausmj.2009.06.006
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/4443

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