The effect of pre-processing and grain structure on the bio-corrosion and fatigue resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31

Wang, H. and Estrin, Y. and Fu, H. M. and Song, G. L. and Zuberova, Z. (2007) The effect of pre-processing and grain structure on the bio-corrosion and fatigue resistance of magnesium alloy AZ31. Advanced Engineering Materials, 9 (11). pp. 967-972. ISSN 1438-1656

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Abstract

Magnesium alloys are broadly used for structural applications in the aerospace and automotive industries as well as in consumer electronics. While a high specific strength is the forte of magnesium alloys, one serious limitation for Mg alloys is their corrosion performance. Unlike aluminium, it does not form a stable passive film to provide long-term protection from further corrosion. The poor corrosion resistance of magnesium and magnesium alloys is regarded as a major drawback, and significant effort has been focused on improving this.[1-3] However, the high reactivity of magnesium alloys in corrosive media can be used to advantage in biomedical applications, particularly in temporary implants where the capacity of a material for bio-degradation is one of the most sought after properties. Indeed, permanent implant materials, such as stainless steel, titanium alloys or Nitinol (55Ni-45Ti), are the only choices currently available for hard tissue implantation. They can cause permanent physical irritation, long-term endothelial dysfunction and chronic inflammatory local reaction. Sometimes a second operation is needed for the implant to be removed. Given the ability of the human body to gradually recover and regenerate damaged tissue, the ideal solution would thus be a degradable implant, which would offer a physiologically less invasive repair and temporary support during tissue recovery. After fulfilling its function, this implant would be obliterated, being absorbed by the body. This philosophy of implant surgery would also be of particular interest for endovascular stents


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Deposited in accordance with the copyright policy of the publisher. Published in Advanced Engineering Materials, 9 (11), 967-972. ISSN 1438-1656.
Depositing User: Dr Hao Wang
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Engineering and Surveying - Department of Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering
Date Deposited: 02 Apr 2008 05:42
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 23:00
Uncontrolled Keywords: magnesium alloys; bio-corrosion; fatigue resistance; pre-processing; grain structure
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 09 Engineering > 0912 Materials Engineering > 091207 Metals and Alloy Materials
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110314 Orthopaedics
Identification Number or DOI: doi: 10.1002/adem.200700200
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/4039

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