Late-onset and recurrent neonatal group B streptococcal disease associated with breast milk transmission

Kotiw, Michael and Zhang, Gwang W. and Daggard, Grant and Reiss-Levy, Elizabeth and Tapsall, John W. and Numa, Andrew (2003) Late-onset and recurrent neonatal group B streptococcal disease associated with breast milk transmission. Pediatric and Developmental Pathology, 6 (3). pp. 251-256. ISSN 1093-5266

Abstract

The purpose of the study was to determine the epidemiological relationships in three unrelated cases of neonatal late-onset Group B streptococcal (GBS) disease and maternal breast-milk infection with GBS. All deliveries were by caesarean section; case 1 was at term, and cases 2 and 3 were at 32- and 33-wk gestation, respectively. Case 1 relates to a mother with clinical mastitis and recurrent GBS infection in a 20-day-old male infant. Following antibiotic therapy and cessation of breastfeeding, the infant recovered without sequelae. Case 2 refers to a mother with clinical mastitis and the occurrence of late-onset GBS disease in 5-wk-old male twins. Despite intervention, one infant died and the second became ill. Following antibiotic therapy and cessation of breast-feeding, the surviving infant recovered without sequelae. Case 3 refers to a mother with sub-clinical mastitis and late-onset GBS infection occurring in a 6-day-old female twin. Following intervention, the infant recovered but suffered a bilateral thalamic infarction resulting in developmental delay and a severe seizure disorder. Following recovery of GBS from an inapparent mastitis and cessation of breast-feeding, the second infant remained well. Blood cultures from all affected infants and maternal breast milk were positive for GBS. Epidemiological relationships between neonatal- and maternal-derived GBS isolates were confirmed by a random amplified polymorphic DNA polymerase chain reaction assay (RAPD-PCR). This study is significant in that it has demonstrated that maternal milk (in cases of either clinical or sub-clinical mastitis) can be a potential source of infection resulting in either late-onset or recurrent neonatal GBS disease.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: © 2003 Society for Pediatric Pathology. Permanent restricted access to paper due to publisher copyright restrictions.
Depositing User: epEditor USQ
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Sciences - Department of Biological and Physical Sciences
Date Deposited: 19 Nov 2007 05:34
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 22:54
Uncontrolled Keywords: breast milk; group B streptococcal disease; infection; neonatal; random amplified polymorphic DNA; polymerase chain reaction; transmission
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 06 Biological Sciences > 0605 Microbiology > 060506 Virology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1114 Paediatrics and Reproductive Medicine > 111403 Paediatrics
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1103 Clinical Sciences > 110309 Infectious Diseases
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9201 Clinical Health (Organs, Diseases and Abnormal Conditions) > 920109 Infectious Diseases
Identification Number or DOI: doi: 10.1007/s10024-001-0276-y
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/3543

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