What can we learn from what works across therapies?

Beel, Nathan (2011) What can we learn from what works across therapies? Counselling Australia, 11 (4). pp. 14-18. ISSN 1832-1135

Abstract

The recent trend in Evidence Based Treatment (EBT) has made counselling more prescriptive about what treatments should and should not be offered to whom. Although evidence suggests that EBT does not necessarily improve treatment effectiveness or client outcomes, it is assumed that evidence-based counselling models and techniques have intrinsic potency, and are more effective than other models in the treatment of certain disorders. The assumption is largely derived from the success of the Medical Model. A number of studies have found that there is little variation in outcomes between models of counselling including EBT. Research suggests that what is important is not what distinguishes one model from another, but rather the commonalities between them. This paper examines the common factors that have been found to have a more positive impact on counselling outcomes than selecting prescribed evidence based treatment approaches. These factors do not constitute an alternative modality but rather highlight potent ingredients common to all modalities. Being aware of what these factors are and integrating them into practice has the potential for improving outcomes.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: No
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Author version not held.
Depositing User: Nathan Beel
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Arts - School of Humanities and Communication
Date Deposited: 30 Mar 2012 08:34
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2013 01:04
Uncontrolled Keywords: common factors, evidence based treatment, medical model
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 16 Studies in Human Society > 1607 Social Work > 160702 Counselling, Welfare and Community Services
17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170106 Health, Clinical and Counselling Psychology
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): C Society > 92 Health > 9202 Health and Support Services > 920201 Allied Health Therapies (excl. Mental Health Services)
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/20828

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