Clinicians perceptions towards wireless handheld devices: an Australian case study

Hafeez-Baig, Abdul and Gururajan, Raj (2011) Clinicians perceptions towards wireless handheld devices: an Australian case study. In: COINFO 2011: 6th International Conference on Cooperation and Promotion of Information Resources in Science and Technology: Coordinative Innovation and Open Sharing, 11-13 Nov 2011, Hangzhou, China.

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Abstract

The commercial development and expansion of wireless networks has led to the creation of Wireless Handheld Technology (WHT) devices which could prove invaluable in a clinical setting. This exploratory study aimed to find the usage of WHT devices and its impact in facilitating the phenomena of interprofessional communication in a hospital clinical team. The study looked at a heterogeneous team of nurses of a regional hospital in Queensland State, Australia. The primary feature of this study deals with the usage of the personal digital assistant and smart phone. A crossover study was carried out for three months in 2010, with the research team. The primary outcome measure for assessing efficiency of communication was to find if the usage of device is helpful in decision making. We also sought to assess the technical readiness, perceived readiness, organizational readiness, clinical practices, social support, compatibility and intention to use by administering a questionnaire. We identify four groups among the respondents, Cluster 1 is characterized by high technical readiness and perceived readiness and low on organisational support, need for clinical practices, social support, need for compatibility and intention to use, Cluster 2 is characterized by high technical readiness, perceived readiness, organizational readiness and intention to use and low on clinical practices, social support and compatibility. Cluster 3 is characterized by high technical readiness, perceived readiness, organizational readiness, clinical practices and social support and low on compatibility and intention to use Cluster 4 is characterized by high technical readiness, perceived readiness, organizational readiness, clinical practices, social support, compatibility and intention to use. Nominal variables (organization, sex, age, experience, position and qualification) produced some significant associations with clusters. It is important to note that the members of the study group, diverse group are more likely to use newer technology and are more receptive to change. The assessment of respondent' perceptions regarding WHT study demonstrated an increasing level of confidence with the devices which is an important characteristic that any device proposed.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Copyright and Reprint Permissions Abstracting is permitted with credit to the source. Libraries are permitted to photocopy beyond the limit of U.S. copyright law for private use of patrons those articles in this volume. For other copying, reprint or republication permission, write to SRP Copyrights Manager, Scientific Research Publishing, Inc., USA. E-mail: service@scirp.org
Depositing User: epEditor USQ
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Business and Law - School of Information Systems
Date Deposited: 20 Dec 2011 04:20
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2013 00:58
Uncontrolled Keywords: wireless; healthcare; adoption; PDA’s; handheld wireless devices; Australian healthcare
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences > 1701 Psychology > 170107 Industrial and Organisational Psychology
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111711 Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
10 Technology > 1005 Communications Technologies > 100510 Wireless Communications
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970108 Expanding Knowledge in the Information and Computing Sciences
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/20456

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