Academics wrestling with the dynamic impact of social connectivity to integrate emerging technologies into higher education curricula

Matthews, K. J. and Danaher, P. A. (2011) Academics wrestling with the dynamic impact of social connectivity to integrate emerging technologies into higher education curricula. Studies in Learning, Evaluation, Innovation and Development , 8 (1). pp. 1-13. ISSN 1832-2050

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Abstract

This article considers how academics wrestle with integrating emerging information and communication technologies (ICTs) into their teaching, and the benefits that they reap as a result. The effective integration of these emerging ICTs into higher education curricula poses a significant challenge for academics to manage the complex interactions that support teaching and learning in higher education. Emerging ICTs create unprecedented opportunities for academics to collaborate on a widespread scale, crossing campus, disciplinary and institutional boundaries to create educational resources and design innovative curricula, yet ongoing effort is required to maximise the potential advantages of those opportunities. This article proposes the authors’ contemporary updating of Latané’s (1981) Dynamic Social Impact Theory (DSIT) in order to assist in explaining the post-2010 reality with which higher education professionals wrestle to reap the benefits of integrating emerging ICT capabilities into their respective higher education curricula. The implications of this connectivity are explored with reference to knowledge management processes, namely how academics deploy ICTs effectively to create, improve, store, use and share aspects of their curricula with students and peers, thereby enhancing teaching and learning outcomes in contemporary universities.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: This article has been peer-reviewed and accepted for publication in SLEID, an international journal of scholarship and research that supports emerging scholars and the development of evidence-based practice in education. © Copyright of articles is retained by authors. As an open access journal, articles are free to use, with proper attribution, in educational and other non-commercial settings. ISSN 1832-2050
Depositing User: Mr Karl Matthews
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Education
Date Deposited: 07 May 2012 03:04
Last Modified: 26 Aug 2014 04:01
Uncontrolled Keywords: Dynamic Impact of Social Connectivity (DISC) theory, Dynamic Social Impact Theory (DSIT), emerging technologies, higher education curricula, knowledge management
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130103 Higher Education
13 Education > 1303 Specialist Studies in Education > 130399 Specialist Studies in Education not elsewhere classified
08 Information and Computing Sciences > 0807 Library and Information Studies > 080709 Social and Community Informatics
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/20096

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