Explaining the experiential consumption of special event entertainment in shopping Centres

Sit, Jason (2010) Explaining the experiential consumption of special event entertainment in shopping Centres. [Thesis (PhD/Research)] (Unpublished)

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Abstract

Shopping centre managers often use special event entertainment to create emotionally-based experiences for their patrons and, in turn, to entice them to engage in positive behaviours (e.g. longer duration of stay, more spending, willingness to spread positive word-of-mouth to others and repatronage intention). Special event entertainment refers to the range of special events convened by a shopping centre on a seasonal, temporary and intermittent basis. Moreover, special event entertainment is also typically offered free of charge to consumers. Due to these unique characteristics, the consumption experience of special event entertainment is deemed as low (enduring) involvement in nature. Popular examples of special event entertainment include school holiday events, fashion events, celebrity appearances, and market days. Despite the common use of special event entertainment by shopping centre managers, little research in experiential consumption literature has paid attention to consumers’ experiences with special event entertainment convened by shopping centres. Consequently, we have scant knowledge of what factors are important in explaining consumers’ experiences with these entertainment events staged by shopping centres. The acquirement of this knowledge can facilitate shopping centre managers in planning, communicating and executing their marketing strategies of special events and, in turn, in fostering shoppers’ approach behaviours. For this reason, this research program attempts to fill this knowledge gap relating to consumers’ experiences with special event entertainment in the existing experiential consumption literature. In particular, this research program seeks to determine: i) the key factors that are important in explaining shoppers’ experiences with special event entertainment; and ii) the relationships between these key factors in explaining shoppers’ experiences with special event entertainment. The first stage of this research program involved a review of experiential consumption literature, especially, in the domains of shopping centre consumption and event consumption. This research stage aimed to identify possible factors that are meaningful in illuminating consumers’ experiences with special event entertainment, and to develop a preliminary model that illustrates the relationships between these factors. The second stage involved a qualitative study, which was conducted to explore the relevance of and the relationships between the theoretical factors identified from the first stage. The third and final stage comprised mall intercept survey with shopping centre patrons during the occurrence of special events at shopping centres. This stage sought to collect real-time, empirical data to test the validity and reliability of the theoretical factors and the conceptual model hypothesised in stage one. This research program makes several contributions. It provides an extension to experiential consumption literature that has somewhat neglected consumers’ experiences with low (enduring) involvement, seasonal and intermittent special events convened by retail institutions such as shopping centres. It identifies a set of cognitive, emotional, behavioural and personal factors that are meaningful in explaining shoppers’ experiences with the special events convened by shopping centres. In terms of marketing practice, this study employs a ‘real-time’, as opposed to a retrospective, data collection approach when measuring shoppers’ experiences with the special events convened by shopping centres. Studies on experiential consumption in the event literature have predominantly relied on a retrospective data collection approach, which often ask attendees or participants to recall and record their experiences in mail survey. This research program seeks to bridge the gap between theory and practice by developing a theoretical model that aims to help retail operators (e.g. shopping centre managers) to understand the strategic roles of special events, especially in creating entertaining and enjoyable experiences for patrons and stimulating approach behaviours (e.g. increased duration of stay andspending).


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Item Type: Thesis (PhD/Research)
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) thesis.
Depositing User: ePrints Administrator
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Business - School of Management and Marketing
Date Deposited: 15 Sep 2011 05:04
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2013 00:46
Uncontrolled Keywords: shopping centres; shopping centers; special event entertainment; entertainment; consumers
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services > 1505 Marketing > 150504 Marketing Measurement
15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services > 1505 Marketing > 150501 Consumer-Oriented Productor Service Development
15 Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services > 1505 Marketing > 150503 Marketing Management (incl. Strategy and Customer Relations)
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/19639

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