Innovation in open and distance learning and teacher education: the case of pre-service secondary vocational education and training at an Australian Regional university

Harreveld, R. E. (Bobby) and Danaher, Patrick Alan (2004) Innovation in open and distance learning and teacher education: the case of pre-service secondary vocational education and training at an Australian Regional university. Journal of Open Learning and Teacher Education, 1 (1). pp. 1-13. ISSN 1596-6348

[img]
Preview
PDF
Harreveld_Danaher_JOLTE_2004.pdf

Download (46Kb)
Official URL: http://www.ntikaduna.org

Abstract

[Abstract]: Debate continues about the appropriateness of open and distance learning as a delivery mode for teacher education. Nevertheless, as with other manifestations of open and distance learning, there is a growing recognition that the potential flexibility afforded by new communication technologies can be aligned with new approaches to curriculum, pedagogy and assessment to provide educational opportunities to prospective and/or current teachers who would otherwise not be able to attain such opportunities. Despite these distinctive advantages, the pressure on open and distance learning approaches to teacher education is undoubtedly greater than with face-to-face models, not least because the latter constitute the default mode of formal education. UNESCO’s recent report Teacher education guidelines: Using open and distance learning: Technology, curriculum, cost, evaluation (Perraton, Creed & Robinson, 2002) provides a useful synthesis of the main elements of this pressure. This paper takes up that challenge in relation to a program of pre-service secondary vocational education and training teacher education (itself often considered marginal to ‘academic’ or ‘general’ secondary teacher education) at Central Queensland University, an Australian regional university. The program is interrogated from the perspective of three of the UNESCO report’s principal concerns: planning; technology; and teaching practice. Denning’s (2004) recent distinction between innovation as a novel idea and as a transformation of practice is used to argue that the program is an educational innovation in both of Denning’s applications of the term, with significant implications for understanding and valuing open and distance learning and teacher education in the early 21st century.


Statistics for USQ ePrint 1896
Statistics for this ePrint Item
Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: No evidence of copyright restrictions - and journal had a very short life.
Depositing User: Assoc Prof Patrick Danaher
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Education
Date Deposited: 28 Oct 2007 10:07
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 22:40
Uncontrolled Keywords: Central Queensland University, innovation, secondary schooling, teacher education, vocational education and training
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 13 Education > 1303 Specialist Studies in Education > 130313 Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators
13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130108 Technical, Further and Workplace Education
13 Education > 1301 Education Systems > 130101 Continuing and Community Education
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/1896

Actions (login required)

View Item Archive Repository Staff Only