Improving health and public safety through knowledge management

Soar, Jeffrey (2004) Improving health and public safety through knowledge management. In: Thailand International Conference on Knowledge Management, 24-25 Nov, 2004, Bangkok, Thailand.

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Abstract

This paper reports on KM in public healthcare and public safety. It reflects the experiences of the author as a CIO (Chief Information Officer) in both industries in Australia and New Zealand. There are commonalities in goals and challenges in KM in both industries. In the case of public safety a goal of modern policing theory is to move more towards intelligence-driven practice. That means interventions based upon research and analysis of information. In healthcare the goals include investment in capacity based upon knowledge of healthcare needs, evidence-based service planning and care delivery, capture of information and provision of knowledge at the point-of-care and evaluation of outcomes. The issue of knowledge management is explored from the perspectives of the user of information and from the discipline of Information Technology and its application to healthcare and public safety. Case studies are discussed to illustrate knowledge management and limiting or enabling factors. These factors include strategy, architecture, standards, feed-back loops, training, quality processes, and social factors such as expectations, ownership of systems and politics.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Depositing User: Professor Jeffrey Soar
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Business - Department of Information Systems
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2007 00:53
Last Modified: 02 Jul 2013 22:40
Uncontrolled Keywords: knowledge management, healthcare, public safety, information technology
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 08 Information and Computing Sciences > 0807 Library and Information Studies > 080708 Records and Information Management (excl. Business Records and Information Management)
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111711 Health Information Systems (incl. Surveillance)
08 Information and Computing Sciences > 0807 Library and Information Studies > 080704 Information Retrieval and Web Search
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/1872

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