Student perception of clicker technology in science and mathematics education

Haeusler, Carole E. and Lozanovski, Con (2010) Student perception of clicker technology in science and mathematics education. In: CETL 2010: Enhancing Learning Experiences in Higher Education, 2-3 Dec 2010, Hong Kong.

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Abstract

We report on the results of integrating student response technology by Turning Point 2008©, simply referred to as clickers, into pre-service science and mathematics and education courses at the University of Southern Queensland (USQ), Australia. Many of the pre-service teachers have weak backgrounds in science and mathematics and lack confidence or interest in these subjects. This study investigated the use of clickers as a means of engaging students with science and mathematics classes and enhancing their learning outcomes. The effect of two different pedagogical uses of clickers on students’ perceptions was also explored. In the science education classes, clickers were used as tool to identify prior knowledge and prompt discussion, whereas in the mathematics education classes, the clickers were used at the end of lectures to check that learning had occurred. Surveys were conducted in the science and mathematics classes using measures of students’ perception of clickers and their contribution to overall learning. Although analyses of these data revealed positive student support for the use of clickers in enhancing student engagement and learning in both science and mathematics classes, students’ responses in the science education classes were far more positive. Further, the impact of the approach used in science education on pre-service teachers’ science teaching self-efficacy was evaluated. A pre-test and post-test in the scienceeducation class using the Science Teaching Efficacy Beliefs Instrument (STEBI) showed significant increases in science teaching selfefficacy, supporting the effectiveness of the pedagogical approach used in science.


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Item Type: Conference or Workshop Item (Commonwealth Reporting Category E) (Paper)
Refereed: Yes
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Copyright © 2010 C. E. Haeusler & C. Lozanovski. The authors assign to CETL, HKU the right to publish this document in full in the conference proceedings. Any other usage is prohibited without the express permission of the authors.
Depositing User: Dr Carole Haeusler
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Education
Date Deposited: 02 Mar 2011 01:54
Last Modified: 03 Jul 2013 00:26
Uncontrolled Keywords: student response technology; science and mathematics education; student learning; pre-service; primary teaching; science; self-efficacy; beliefs
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 13 Education > 1303 Specialist Studies in Education > 130313 Teacher Education and Professional Development of Educators
13 Education > 1303 Specialist Studies in Education > 130306 Educational Technology and Computing
13 Education > 1302 Curriculum and Pedagogy > 130212 Science, Technology and Engineering Curriculum and Pedagogy
Socio-Economic Objective (SEO2008): E Expanding Knowledge > 97 Expanding Knowledge > 970113 Expanding Knowledge in Education
C Society > 93 Education and Training > 9301 Learner and Learning > 930102 Learner and Learning Processes
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/18154

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