How safe is a place in the shade?

Turnbull, David J. (2004) How safe is a place in the shade? Campus Review, 14 (12). p. 9.

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Abstract

Australia has the unenviable reputation of having one of the highest rates of mortality for skin cancer in the world. Skin cancer has been linked to excessive and repeated exposures to solar UV radiation, and causes more than 1000 deaths in Australia each year, with the majority of these being preventable. The role that solar UV radiation plays in the welfare of human beings is both good and bad, from helping bones absorb calcium more efficiently to the genesis of fatal skin cancers. As the public’s understanding of the damaging effects associated with over-exposure to UV radiation increases, shaded environments will be sought to reduce personal UV exposure. A common misconception is that shade protects the human body against all ultraviolet radiation. While direct UV from the Sun is reflected or absorbed by the shade structure, the diffuse UV component is still present in the shade. Scattering of UV radiation by the atmosphere and the ground cover are the main causes of the diffuse UV. Over-exposure to this diffuse UV radiation may cause a number of conditions, particularly sunburn and eye damage.


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Item Type: Article (Commonwealth Reporting Category C)
Refereed: No
Item Status: Live Archive
Additional Information: Awaiting copyright advice.
Depositing User: Dr David Turnbull
Faculty / Department / School: Historic - Faculty of Sciences - Department of Biological and Physical Sciences
Date Deposited: 11 Oct 2007 00:35
Last Modified: 25 Sep 2013 02:08
Uncontrolled Keywords: Australia, skin cancer, solar UV radiation, untraviolet radiation,shade, shade structures, protection, effectiveness
Fields of Research (FOR2008): 04 Earth Sciences > 0401 Atmospheric Sciences > 040199 Atmospheric Sciences not elsewhere classified
11 Medical and Health Sciences > 1117 Public Health and Health Services > 111705 Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety
04 Earth Sciences > 0401 Atmospheric Sciences > 040103 Atmospheric Radiation
URI: http://eprints.usq.edu.au/id/eprint/1115

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